THE PREPOSTEROUS BOLLOX OF THE SITUATION

A collection of stuff, things, nonsense, rants, raves, pretties, sillies, and gee-gaws from Rev. Hugo Nebula, Ordained Minister of the Church of the SubGenius. (And boobs. Sometimes there are boobs. Just like in real life.) Thank you for reading.
 

 

 

 

 
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karsnark:

[on portraying Melisandre in ‘Game of Thrones’] Playing evil is just not interesting. I don’t think anyone who does evil stuff thinks they’re doing evil stuff. That’s the scary part. The people who do things we despise or don’t understand - they think they’re doing a good thing, which is so scary. I think that is the only way for me to play her, because otherwise I’m fighting with her.

(via o-atlas)

missbassweight:

patternicity:

This is one of the saddest things I have ever seen.

Forever reblog. hate is taught, always.

(via countvonlamk)

Welcome, new follower all-the-scientology.

(via all-the-scientology)

"More human than human" is our motto.

(via o-atlas)

"Don’t tell Sharon Anderson Wright that bookstores are a dying industry. The 56-year-old CEO of Half Price Books took a disorganized collection of stores co-founded by her mom—they started by selling used paperbacks and hardcovers out of a dingy former laundromat—and transformed the operation into a chain that is defying a seemingly inexorable tide. While bookstores are shuttered around the country and industry revenue has decreased an average of 3.2% a year over the past five years, Half Price Books is growing. It opens about five stores a year, with revenues rising from $50 million in 1995 to $240 million in 2013. The company is able to resist the Amazon.com tsunami by diversifying its offerings and preserving an in-store experience, while keeping its real estate costs low and remaining debt-free as it expands beyond its 120 retail locations in 16 states. And today the stores still honor their founding promise: They’ll buy virtually anything that is printed (or recorded), excepting newspapers. That’s a proposition that keeps customers returning—in any era…"

(via o-atlas)

xombiedirge:

Rumble in R’lyeh by Chet Phillips / Store

Part of the “Icons of Horror: A Haunted Portrait Show,” in cooperation with Blood Over Texas & Gore Noir Magazine, opens October 31st, 2014, at Guzu Gallery.

All artwork available online 12pm CST, November 3rd, 2014, HERE.

Welcome, new follower fr00123.

(via fr00123)

royalboiler:

Farel is soo good. 

mostlysignssomeportents:

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As technologies and methods advanced, workers in all industries became able to produce much more value in a shorter amount of time. You’d think this would lead to shorter workdays.

But the 8-hour workday is too profitable for big business, not because of the amount of work people get done in eight hours (the average office worker gets less than three hours of actual work done in 8 hours) but because it makes for such a purchase-happy public. Keeping free time scarce means people pay a lot more for convenience, gratification, and any other relief they can buy. It keeps them watching television, and its commercials. It keeps them unambitious outside of work.

We’ve been led into a culture that has been engineered to leave us tired, hungry for indulgence, willing to pay a lot for convenience and entertainment, and most importantly, vaguely dissatisfied with our lives so that we continue wanting things we don’t have. We buy so much because it always seems like something is still missing.

Western economies, particularly that of the United States, have been built in a very calculated manner on gratification, addiction, and unnecessary spending. We spend to cheer ourselves up, to reward ourselves, to celebrate, to fix problems, to elevate our status, and to alleviate boredom.

Read the rest…

mostlysignssomeportents:

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Mark wrote in July that Lt John Pike, the UC Davis cop who attained notoriety after he sadistically hosed down seated, peaceful protesters with pepper spray, jetting it directly down their throats and into their eyes, had applied for worker’s comp for the psychiatric injuries resulting from everyone in the world thinking he was a horrible, horrible person.

Now he has been awarded $38K by California’s Division of Workers’ Compensation Appeals Board. He left his job (which paid nearly $120K), and has had to change addresses and phone numbers several times to dodge harassment from his detractors. Davis settled a lawsuit by the protesters he sprayed for $1M.

Read the rest…

visceri:

Lol :D

Welcome, new follower everything-scientology.

visceri:

Lol :D

Welcome, new follower everything-scientology.

(via everything-scientology)

Don’t take my word for it, but you can be almost certain that a lot of the things you “know” aren’t really true. I would bet money that some of the facts of life you currently feel certain about can be found on this list of common misconceptions

"We do learn quite a bit about the world from direct experience. But clearly, most of our learning amounts to believing the beliefs of other people, whether they’re expressed in a Facebook post or in a textbook. You hear or read something, and if it seems true you’ll probably believe it. In all likelihood you’ll never try to verify that belief unless someone else challenges it, and it may never occur to you that it might be wrong. Once a belief has established itself, we freely tell others what we know, or think we know, and the process repeats.

"This indiscriminate passing-on of totally unverified information is a bad habit we human beings have always had. We seem to be more interested in making impressions on others than really knowing what’s true…"