THE PREPOSTEROUS BOLLOX OF THE SITUATION

A collection of stuff, things, nonsense, rants, raves, pretties, sillies, and gee-gaws from Rev. Hugo Nebula, Ordained Minister of the Church of the SubGenius. (And boobs. Sometimes there are boobs. Just like in real life.) Thank you for reading.
 

 

 

 

 
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This way he smiled as far away.
Surely do anything to sleep with,
sighed Emma; prayed for someone.

hattiewatson:

// you can feel more connected and at home through just the touch of a hand to the back of someones neck. something about the familiarity and energy that pulses right through to you. //

matt112830:

sharplydressedtentacles:

banesidhe:

calming-tea:

samrgarrett:

outofthecavern:

opiatevampire:

theworldisconfused:

In addition to essentially inventing the computer, Alan Turing also broke the German Enigma Code during World War II which paved the way for the D-Day invasion. The man was a hyper-genius. I’ve read descriptions of his work by mathematical physicist Sir Roger Penrose. He’s been a hero of mine ever since.

The level of thought required to come up with the stuff he came up with is totally beyond my comprehension. I actually did not even know about his orientation until much later. He was prosecuted and ordered to undergo chemical castration. Soon thereafter, he committed suicide by eating a cyanide-laced apple.

The government forced him to take estrogen as a punishment (or “cure”?). He began to develop breasts and other side effects.

He committed suicide by biting into a cyanide laced apple. This is supposedly the inspiration for the name/logo of Apple computers.

omfg

omfg

and old Apple computers

the apple was a rainbow 

image

image

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Reblogging again because more people need to know about Turing dammit.

Whoa…

(via o-atlas)


Preliminary cover illustration for Horror at Gull House,1973

Preliminary cover illustration for Horror at Gull House,1973

(via horrorking)

thievingbadgers:

Comic Meme> [5/5] Favorite Series

     Pretty Deadly

  “If you done been wronged…say her name, sing this song…Ginny rides for you on the wind, my child…death rides on the wind.”

(via prettydeadlycomic)

When the movie releases, are you prepared to be a hero to thousands of kids? What will it mean to you? (x)

(via o-atlas)

The basics are that for every one female-speaking character in family-rated films (G, PG and PG-13), there are roughly three male characters; that crowd and group scenes in these films — live-action and animated — contain only 17 percent female characters; and that the ratio of male-female characters has been exactly the same since 1946. Throw in the hypersexualization of many of the female characters that are there, even in G-rated movies, and their lack of occupations and aspirations and you get the picture.

It wasn’t the lack of female lead characters that first struck me about family films. We all know that’s been the case for ages, and we love when movies like The Hunger Games: Catching Fire and Frozen hit it big. It was the dearth of female characters in the worlds of the stories — the fact that the fictitious villages and jungles and kingdoms and interplanetary civilizations were nearly bereft of female population — that hit me over the head. This being the case, we are in effect enculturating kids from the very beginning to see women and girls as not taking up half of the space. Couldn’t it be that the percentage of women in leadership positions in many areas of society — Congress, law partners, Fortune 500 board members, military officers, tenured professors and many more — stall out at around 17 percent because that’s the ratio we’ve come to see as the norm?

OK, now for the fun part: It’s easy, fast and fun to add female characters, in two simple steps. And I want to be clear I’m not talking about creating more movies with a female lead. If you do, God bless and thank you. Please consider me for that role.

Step 1: Go through the projects you’re already working on and change a bunch of the characters’ first names to women’s names. With one stroke you’ve created some colorful unstereotypical female characters that might turn out to be even more interesting now that they’ve had a gender switch. What if the plumber or pilot or construction foreman is a woman? What if the taxi driver or the scheming politician is a woman? What if both police officers that arrive on the scene are women — and it’s not a big deal?

Step 2: When describing a crowd scene, write in the script, “A crowd gathers, which is half female.” That may seem weird, but I promise you, somehow or other on the set that day the crowd will turn out to be 17 percent female otherwise. Maybe first ADs think women don’t gather, I don’t know.

And there you have it. You have just quickly and easily boosted the female presence in your project without changing a line of dialogue.

Yes, we can and will work to tell more women’s stories, listen to more women’s voices and write richer female characters and to fix the 5-to-1 ratio of men/women behind the camera. But consider this: In all of the sectors of society that still have a huge gender disparity, how long will it take to correct that? You can’t snap your fingers and suddenly half of Congress is women. But there’s one category where the underrepresentation of women can be fixed tomorrow: onscreen. In the time it takes to make a movie or create a television show, we can change what the future looks like.

There are woefully few women CEOs in the world, but there can be lots of them in films. We haven’t had a woman president yet, but we have on TV. (Full disclosure: One of them was me.) How can we fix the problem of corporate boards being so unequal without quotas? Well, they can be half women instantly, onscreen. How do we encourage a lot more girls to pursue science, technology and engineering careers? By casting droves of women in STEM jobs today in movies and on TV. Hey, it would take me many years to become a real nuclear physicist, but I can play one tomorrow.

Here’s what I always say: If they can see it, they can be it.

Geena Davis on gender equality in film and television [x] (via wesleywalesandersons)

(via aleskot)

Whatever you now find weird, ugly, uncomfortable and nasty about a new medium will surely become its signature. CD distortion, the jitteriness of digital video, the crap sound of 8-bit, all of these will be cherished and emulated as soon as they can be avoided. It’s the sound of failure: so much modern art is the sound of things going out of control, of a medium pushing to its limits and breaking apart. The distorted guitar sound is the sound of something too loud for the medium supposed to carry it. The blues singer with the cracked voice is the sound of an emotional cry too powerful for the throat that releases it. The excitement of grainy film, of bleached-out black and white, is the excitement of witnessing events too momentous for the medium assigned to record them.

Brian Eno, A Year With Swollen Appendices (via fleurlungs)

(via arabellesicardi)

(via stvitussdance)

my-ponchoboys:

Karen Gillan ~ Super Villain

my-ponchoboys:

Karen Gillan ~ Super Villain

(via fuckyeahkarengillan)

"Angela Carter… was not a horror writer in the same sense as Anne Rice or Stephen King; the bulk of her work is classified as magical realism (a made-up, jerk-off genre that permits English departments to acknowledge the existence of the human imagination), but her most celebrated book is a high gothic collection of short stories called The Bloody Chamber that you should read immediately if the genre holds any appeal for you. Or even if it doesn’t…"

Here, Jake took one baby,
said Jake, trying not leaving the other.
Stop by now it right.
Madison all those years.
Welcome home.