THE PREPOSTEROUS BOLLOX OF THE SITUATION

A collection of stuff, things, nonsense, rants, raves, pretties, sillies, and gee-gaws from Rev. Hugo Nebula, Ordained Minister of the Church of the SubGenius. (And boobs. Sometimes there are boobs. Just like in real life.) Thank you for reading.
 

 

 

 

 
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Posts tagged "david cronenberg"
foreignmovieposters:

Videodrome (1982). Japanese poster.

foreignmovieposters:

Videodrome (1982). Japanese poster.

(via horrorking)


"Somebody said I’m ‘the king of venereal horror,’ to which I always say: Well, it’s a very small kingdom, but it’s mine.” — David Cronenberg

"Somebody said I’m ‘the king of venereal horror,’ to which I always say: Well, it’s a very small kingdom, but it’s mine.” — David Cronenberg

(via horrorking)

aleskot:

"Crash is peculiarly resistant to attempts to summarise it with a single image. Its synthetic literary method depends on the conjunction within a verbal image of phenomena that are usually discrete. Ballard insistently establishes geometrical relationships between the body parts and postures of his characters and the technology that surrounds them: ‘By entering her vagina among the metal cabinets and white cables of the X-ray department I would somehow conjure back her husband from the dead, from the conjunction of her left armpit and the chromium camera stand, from the marriage of our genitalia and the elegantly tooled lens shroud.’ In the late 1980s, collage and montage became increasingly prevalent means of expressing thematic complexity on book covers. If ever a novel called out for a mode of evocation based on fragments and juxtaposition, it was Crash, but it was 1994 before an American design team explored this possibility."

"Collapsing Bulkheads: The Covers of Crash"

aleskot:

"Crash is peculiarly resistant to attempts to summarise it with a single image. Its synthetic literary method depends on the conjunction within a verbal image of phenomena that are usually discrete. Ballard insistently establishes geometrical relationships between the body parts and postures of his characters and the technology that surrounds them: ‘By entering her vagina among the metal cabinets and white cables of the X-ray department I would somehow conjure back her husband from the dead, from the conjunction of her left armpit and the chromium camera stand, from the marriage of our genitalia and the elegantly tooled lens shroud.’ In the late 1980s, collage and montage became increasingly prevalent means of expressing thematic complexity on book covers. If ever a novel called out for a mode of evocation based on fragments and juxtaposition, it was Crash, but it was 1994 before an American design team explored this possibility."

"Collapsing Bulkheads: The Covers of Crash"

The battle for the mind of North America will be fought in the video arena: the Videodrome. The television screen is the retina of the mind’s eye. Therefore, the television screen is part of the physical structure of the brain. Therefore, whatever appears on the television screen emerges as raw experience for those who watch it. Therefore, television is reality, and reality is less than television.

(via horrorking)

ronaldcmerchant:

RABID (1977)

(via swampthingy)

"WE’RE PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE POD (PERSONAL ON-DEMAND), THE FIRST RELEASE IN OUR BODY MIND CHANGE™ SERIES. THIS NEXT GENERATION RECOMMENDATION ENGINE KNOWS WHAT YOU WANT BEFORE YOU DO. FORGED FROM AN INNOVATIVE PARTNERSHIP WITH CREATIVE VISIONARY DAVID CRONENBERG, BMC LABS HAS SECURED AN EXCLUSIVE LICENSE TO ALL THE BIOLOGY AND TECHNOLOGY IP FOUND WITHIN CRONENBERG’S FILMS. IN THE PROCESS, BMC IS TURNING SCIENCE FICTION INTO SCIENCE FACT.

"POD REINVENTS THE RECOMMENDATION ENGINE TO MAKE DISCOVERING THE THINGS YOU NEED, LOVE OR DESIRE EFFORTLESS. THIS STATE OF THE ART BIOTECH IMPLANT WILL GUARANTEE YOU PERSONALIZED RECOMMENDATIONS THAT ARE 99.999% RELEVANT ALL THE TIME. POD GROWS WITH YOU TO BECOME AN INTUITIVE COMPANION, ENHANCING YOUR LIFE AND STORING THE BEST THAT THE WORLD HAS TO OFFER FOR IMMEDIATE RECALL AT ANY TIME. AFTER A LIGHT TRAINING PERIOD, POD WILL BE ABLE TO PREDICT YOUR DEEPEST UNFULFILLED DESIRES – EVEN THE ONES YOU DIDN’T KNOW YOU HAD."

(via About / BMC Labs)

"Body/Mind/Change (BMC), a digital extension of TIFF’s exhibition David Cronenberg: Evolution, immerses audiences in a "Cronenbergian" world inspired by the film Videodrome, re-imagined for the 21st century and brought to life across three platforms— online, mobile, and real-world. Co-produced by the Canadian Film Centre’s Media Lab (CFC Media Lab) with creative direction by Lance Weiler, Body/Mind/Change features plot lines and game mechanics involving biotechnology start-ups, body enhancements, emotional learning systems, and presents the plausible science fiction found in Cronenberg’s work as scientific fact…"

BODY/MIND/CHANGE: David Cronenberg leads us into the future of human bio implants with BMC Labs. (by BodyMindChange)

hellooblivion:

Videodrome- David Cronenberg, 1983"After all, there is nothing real outside our perception of reality, is there?"

hellooblivion:

Videodrome- David Cronenberg, 1983
"After all, there is nothing real outside our perception of reality, is there?"

(via horrorking)

tachyonsplus:

love or video?

"…much of everyday life is a massive media event devoid of meaning. The old flesh is tired, used up, and toxic. The world is filled with a suffering assuaged only by glowing television screens…”

film-dot-com:

THE DANGER OF WATCHING MOVIES IRONICALLY

Several years ago I attended a midnight screening of one of my favorite horror movies, David Cronenberg’s “The Brood”, a film I’ve always regarded as deeply affecting and scary. I don’t know exactly how I was expecting a rowdy group of twentysomethings to react to a relatively low-budget Canadian horror film from the late 1970s at midnight on a Saturday night—the kind of reverence and awe with which I’d long treated the film were probably too much to expect even in more somber circumstances—but I do know that the reaction the film provoked that night took me by surprise. The reaction was laughter. Within seconds of the film beginning, it became obvious that people had come to laugh at what they assumed going in was to be nothing more than a cheesy, stupid old horror movie, some hammy B-picture with stylized acting and dated effects. The constant ridicule which followed seemed only to confirm the assumption: “The Brood” was a film better watched ironically than in earnest.

It’s easy to laugh at something when you’ve decided in advance that it’s going to be funny. It’s even easier when a room full of people are laughing along with you. I’ve seen a person laugh at a new release horror film so loudly that you could almost feel the tension and dread in the room dissipating, as if the disruption had set a precedent for all who heard it that what followed was funny rather than scary, causing laughter to spread through the crowd. I’ve seen crowds whoop and holler through “Eraserhead” as if it were “The Rocky Horror Picture Show”. I’ve seen boorish teenagers yell out insults at Shelley Duvall throughout Halloween screenings of “The Shining”. I’ve even seen a classroom full of Film Studies undergraduates laugh through George Romero’s original “Night of the Living Dead”, practically bursting into applause when Duane Jones slaps Judith O’Dea across the face. There is no limit to how a room full of people will react while sitting through a movie they have decided not to take seriously.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE ON FILM.COM

(via emmra)

David Cronenberg had already made a name for himself by the late 70s, thanks to the cult success of his first pair of low-budget features, Shivers and Rabid. But a divorce and subsequent custody battle left Cronenberg determined to get his emotions down on paper - and the resulting screenplay was the most powerful and autobiographical writing he’d yet produced.

The Brood got to the real nightmare, horrific, unbelievable inner life of the situation,” he said in an interview for the book Cronenberg On Cronenberg. ”I’m not being facetious when I say I think it’s more realistic, even more naturalistic, than [Kramer Vs Kramer]. I felt that bad. It was that horrible, that damaging. That’s why it had to be made then; it wanted to be made full blast…”