THE PREPOSTEROUS BOLLOX OF THE SITUATION

A collection of stuff, things, nonsense, rants, raves, pretties, sillies, and gee-gaws from Rev. Hugo Nebula, Ordained Minister of the Church of the SubGenius. (And boobs. Sometimes there are boobs. Just like in real life.) Thank you for reading.
 

 

 

 

 
Read the Printed Word!
I Like
I Follow
Posts tagged "horror"

"It’s that time of year again, when the pumpkins come out, the fake cobwebs are hung and we feel that dormant urge to be chilled, thrilled and spooked to our bones. Get out your flashlights, because a scary story awaits — actually, make that fifty of them. Now, there’s more to scary stories than goblins, ghouls, blood and your general horror — here there be monsters of many kinds, existential and literal, extraordinary and everyday. And remember: like beauty, fear is in the bloody eye of the beholder. So whether you yearn for classic horror or literary fiction guaranteed to make your skin crawl, read on. If you dare!"

"The cold, wet summer of 1816, a night of ghost stories and a challenge allowed a young woman to delineate the darkness, and give us a way of looking at the world.

"They were in a villa on the shores of Lake Geneva: Lord Byron – the bestselling poet, too dangerous for the drawing rooms of England and in exile; his doctor, John William Polidori; Percy Shelley, poet and atheist, and his soon-to-be wife, 18-year-old Mary Shelley. Ghost stories were read, and then Byron challenged everyone in the group to come up with a new story. He started, but did not finish, one about vampires; Polidori completed "The Vampyre"; and young Mary, already the mother of a living child and a dead one, imagined a story about a man who fabricated a living creature, a monster, and brought it to life. The book she wrote over the following year, initially published anonymously, was Frankenstein or, The Modern Prometheus, and it slowly changed everything…"

mostlysignssomeportents:

image

Les Klinger’s enormous volume has earned critical praise from Neil Gaiman, Gahan Wilson, Peter Straub and Harlan Ellison; the book is big enough to stun an (eldritch demon) ox, and is introduced by none other than Alan Moore.

In addition to being extremely illuminating on the subject of Lovecraft, this book is flat-out gorgeous, an instant drool-inducer.

"In one way, at least, our lives really are like movies. The main cast consists of your family and friends. The supporting cast is made up of neighbors, co-workers, teachers, and daily acquaintances. There are also bit players: the supermarket checkout girl with the pretty smile, the friendly bartender at the local watering hole, the guys you work out with at the gym three days a week. And there are thousands of extras—those people who flow through every life like water through a sieve, seen once and never again. The teenager browsing graphic novels at Barnes & Noble, the one you had to slip past (murmuring “Excuse me”) in order to get to the magazines. The woman in the next lane at a stoplight, taking a moment to freshen her lipstick. The mother wiping ice cream off her toddler’s face in a roadside restaurant where you stopped for a quick bite. The vendor who sold you a bag of peanuts at a baseball game.

"But sometimes a person who fits none of these categories comes into your life. This is the joker who pops out of the deck at odd intervals over the years, often during a moment of crisis. In the movies this sort of character is known as the fifth business, or the change agent. When he turns up in a film, you know he’s there because the screenwriter put him there. But who is screenwriting our lives? Fate or coincidence? I want to believe it’s the latter. I want that with all my heart and soul. When I think of Charles  Jacobs—my fifth business, my change agent, my nemesis—I can’t bear to believe his presence in my life had anything to do with fate. It would mean that all these terrible things—these horrors —were meant to happen. If that is so, then there is no such thing as light, and our belief in it is a foolish illusion. If that is so, we live in dark-ness like animals in a burrow, or ants deep in their hill.

"And not alone…"

If a writer like me has any value at all, then I think what I’m supposed to say are things that other people either don’t dare to say or find embarrassing. They say to themselves, “But if I say that, what will people think of me?”
That’s why I think most people see horror writers as depraved individuals who are strange, weird, a little bit creepy, probably unlovely, somebody who would be clammy to touch.
Most of the ones I know are big, hale and hearty, cheerful, outgoing, friendly people, and I think one of the reasons they are is that you have to have a certain confidence in yourself to be able to create a human monster.
Those are things that a lot of us keep locked in the closets of our minds and if we let them out, we let them out when there’s nobody around and our wives, husbands, or lovers are asleep.
Stephen King (via writingquotes)

(via fiercebunny)

"David S. Goyer has set up another genre project at the network, an event series based on the 1980 dark fantasy novel Shadowland by Peter Straub. The book, a World Fantasy Award nominee, centers on two young boys, Tom Flanagan and Del Nightingale. They spend a summer with Del’s uncle Coleman, one of the foremost magicians in the world, who may actually be a sorcerer…"

Straub’s Shadowland is a beautiful, subtle, and elegiac novel which would make a great TV series under a thoughtful and delicate hand. But David S Goyer is doing it, so that’s that fucked.

The Haunting of Hill House T-shirt.

"Hill House, not sane, stood by itself against its hills, holding darkness within; it has stood so for eighty years and might stand for eighty more." From the first edition cover.

- 100% cotton fitted tee 

- Distressed, softened print

- Color: black

Purchase of this shirt sends one book to a community in need

francavillarts:

Just remembering an old friend who passed away 165 years ago today. Pouring one for you, Edgar.

Cheers!

FF

Suspiria (1977, dir. Dario Argento).

(via emmra)