THE PREPOSTEROUS BOLLOX OF THE SITUATION

A collection of stuff, things, nonsense, rants, raves, pretties, sillies, and gee-gaws from Rev. Hugo Nebula, Ordained Minister of the Church of the SubGenius. (And boobs. Sometimes there are boobs. Just like in real life.) Thank you for reading.
 

 

 

 

 
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Posts tagged "technology"
unlawfulsurveillancesexcrime:

Follow iVictim http://ivictim.tumblr.com as this blog will no longer be posting. 

Welcome, new follower unlawfulsurveillancesexcrime!

unlawfulsurveillancesexcrime:

Follow iVictim http://ivictim.tumblr.com as this blog will no longer be posting. 

Welcome, new follower unlawfulsurveillancesexcrime!

bevismusson:

thehappysorceress:

shelephant:

erichmcbrian:

xinggan:

CGI technology has brought the late Audrey Hepburn back to the screen, as she stars in a TV advertisement for the chocolate company, Galaxy. Hepburn’s sons, Sean Ferrer and Luca Dotti, said regarding the project: “Our mother often spoke about her love of chocolate and how it lifted her spirit, so we’re sure she would have been proud of her role as the face of Galaxy.” (watch the commercial here)

I wanna bring this back and remind everyone that the entire commercial is in CGI, not just Audrey. 

Well, that’s.. Really, really creepy.
Even if she loved chocolate more than anything, which, sure, I can give to that because chocolate is great
bringing back people from the dead to advertise is just really, really creepy.

I’ve found this process disturbing ever since Fred Astaire danced for a vacuum cleaner company.

The whole advert is *terrifying*. It’s the whole uncanny valley issue. The CGI is excellent, but Hepburn is especially dead behind the eyes. I mean, she was pretty wooden in real life, but as a CGI character she looks like she’s about to rip off the rubber mask that is her face and start the robot revolution.

Technologically, this is brilliant. Ethically, no. Especially not for advertising, which is morally bankrupt in almost all respects anyway. You can’t speak for the dead in this way. It’s wrong.

Spritz’s mission is to change the way people read and make communication faster, easier, and more effective…

The time consuming part of reading lies mainly in the actual eye movements from word to word and sentence to sentence. In addition, traditional reading simply takes up a lot of physical space. Spritz solves both of these problems. First, your eyes do not have to move from word to word or around the page that you’re reading. In fact, there’s no longer a page – with Spritz you only need 13 total characters to show all of your content. Fast streaming of text is easier and more comfortable for the reader, especially when reading areas become smaller. Spritz’s patent-pending technology can also be integrated into photos, maps, videos, and websites for more effective communication…”

freshest-tittymilk:

fuckingrenades:

startledatthestillness:

Haha

I’m crying. Omfg.

There are real tears in my eyes

(via bevismusson)

t-leafd:

A Gorgeous, Colorful Look At The Cellphone Signals We Never See

Invisible signals are all around us, and now we can finally see what we’ve been missing. Data visualization artist Nickolay Lamm created psychedelic images of the cellphone signals that live in the air, but are invisible to us.

Well now you can find the others, you don’t have to stick a flower in your hair and go to San Francisco. You just go to the Web. Find the others. We all need to create affinity groups which are subsets of the much larger community that we’re part of. And then, using this technology, which was designed to keep track of us, to pick our pockets, and to sell us junk we don’t want, use this technology to produce art, massive amounts of subversive art, and ALL art is subversive, I’m not calling for an ideological agenda. All truth that springs from the individual is subversive, because culture is not your friend.
Terence McKenna (via vagabondbohemia)

(via stvitussdance)

The OSD confirms their fax machine is down, possibly for another few months, because there’s no money in their tens of billions of dollars a year budget for a new one, and they can’t switch to email as a request method. “The office that oversees the most powerful military in history (not to mention the best-funded) is unable to project when its single fax machine will once again be operational.”

"The Topics of these video documentaries are varied and cover almost everything, including ancient history, Rome, Greece, science, technology, nature, planet earth, the solar system, the whole universe, war, science, education, television, archaeology, space, aliens, ufos, conspiracy theories, Nephilim, Illuminati, Area 51, serial killers, paranormal, supernatural…"

Prince Exposing Illuminati Plans for Depopulation (by NephilimObjects)

shortformblog:

How JPEG compression affects Shakespeare

Just for kicks, speaker and overall techie Tom Scott took a copy of Romeo & Juliet, saved the text file as a RAW Photoshop file, then saved the files as JPGs at different levels of compression to see how it corrupted the file. He then printed up the results as bound books, which is sort of a fun way to waste money. The results? At 100 percent, the text is barely readable. At 50 percent, it looks like gibberish. At zero percent, it looks like an accident. But the images Scott created? Here’s the interesting part: “On the front of each book is the JPEG image it was derived from,” he explains “And, for all but the lowest quality, they appear utterly identical to the naked eye.” Check the middle images of the photoset to see the photos in order.

(via stvitussdance)

"It took 10 years and an elite unit from America’s navy seals to hunt down Osama bin Laden. Now the technology used to track the most elusive terrorist in history is at the centre of another top mission to help to enhance the life of cakes in British bakeries.

"Strathclyde University has been awarded a grant to examine how the imaging used on the helicopters that surrounded Bin Laden’s Pakistan compound in 2011 might be used to perfect cupcakes, Victoria sponges and a host of other staples of the British diet.."

Well, we live in a technological age. Time has passed, and we have stepped over the ruins of our own societies, and our own civilisations, and we come now to the fruition of those things about which the human race has dreamed. We have flight and we have electronic assistants. The entertainment media – which are always very timorous and step very carefully out of fear and loathing – don’t know what they’re doing so much. So they go back, and they are catching up on the kind of science fiction – and they call it, in that ugly, ugly phrase, “sci-fi,” which those who have worked in speculative fiction despise, it’s like calling a woman a “broad” – they are catching up on ideas that were covered with hoarfrost 60 years ago. That’s why you have an overabundance of zombies and walking dead, and world war and asteroids from space. They have not yet tackled any of the truly interesting discussions of humanity that are treated in speculative fiction. But they are a break from standard 19th, early 20th-century fiction, and so they seem fresh to an audience that is essentially ignorant…”

"Earlier this year, without much fanfare, David Cronenberg quietly licensed the fictional technology and science found within his films ShiversThe BroodScannersVideodrome and eXistenZfor a mind-bending eight-figure sum. While it is common for a film’s IP to make its way into other mediums, such as books, television or games, it is highly unusual for a film’s fictional elements to become actual biotechnology. The deal was struck by a stealth Los Angeles-based biotech startup called Body Mind Change Labs. BMC intends to turn Cronenberg’s science fiction into science fact. The company’s first release is called POD (Personal On-Demand), a next-generation recommendation engine inspired by Cronenberg’s eXistenZ that helps its hosts discover what they need, love or desire, effortlessly…”

"The closure of Google Reader has got early adopters and developers worried that Google services or APIs they adopt will just get shut off. An analysis of 39 shuttered offerings says how long they get…"

"Here’s the problem: Google now has a clear enough track record of trying out, and then canceling, "interesting" new software that I have no idea how long Keep will be around…

"Until I know a reason that it’s in Google’s long-term interest to keep Keep going, I’m not going to invest time in it or lodge info there.”